Analytics Platform Uses Space Data to Create the Future of Farming

Satellites
July 23, 2019
Author
Justus Kilian
Jessica Holland
July 23, 2019
Authors
Justus Kilian
Jessica Holland

The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


Analytics Platform Uses Space Data to Create the Future of Farming
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The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


The world’s population is set to grow by more than a third by 2050, according to the FAO. To feed those people, crop yields must be increased at a similar pace. In the past, output has been increased by farming more land, applying more fertilizers, and genetically modifying crops. But these solutions are maxed out. Something new must be done to address the growing demand.

What will meet this surging need, research suggests, is precision agriculture. It’s a field in which satellite imagery plays an important role, and which NASA chief Jim Bridenstine drew attention to just last month.

“We are increasing crop yields right now,” he said, “and we’re going to be able to feed more of the world than ever before because of NASA technology.” Setting up this infrastructure, he added, “has implications for humankind generations from now.”

Data powers modern agriculture

Precision agriculture involves many methods for increasing efficiency on farms, lowering costs and boosting yields. These include targeted planting, irrigation, fertilizer application, and pesticide spraying. The exact specifications are determined by monitoring soil conditions, weather and other variables at a granular level. Self-driving tractors are another part of the equation and may be simpler to develop than self-driving cars

There’s a multi-tiered landscape of companies offering products to deliver this type of efficiency:

  • Imagery providers generate data from satellites, planes, and drones. This data is often distributed to the end-user with basic and limited models if any analysis is provided at all. 
  • IoT sensor platform solutions deploy smart hardware to capture rainfall, sunlight, and temperature data, giving insight into a farm’s micro-climate. Again, this is often provided to the end-user with little additional analysis.
  • Farm management software automates the recording and storage of data, facilitates the monitoring and analyzing of all farm activities, and streamlines production and work schedules.
  • Machinery and data collection companies act as the farm’s command center, collecting and managing farm data from different sources. In some instances, this data is used to power machinery.


Progress accelerated by new-generation satellite services

Earth observation satellites play an important role in this process and have been a source of critical information for large-scale farms for decades. Now it’s easier than ever to access EO data from new satellites, thanks to new platforms like SkyWatch’s EarthCache. This progress has accelerated the development of highly specialized agricultural services that are needed to feed the world’s growing population.

We’ve been monitoring opportunities in this sector, waiting for a solution that represented a step change for agronomics. Too many companies were attempting to reinvent the customer’s workflow, trying to provide too many services, and targeting the farmer as the primary end-user. These strategies have resulted in products that are a low value-add, non-sticky, and low-margin.

FluroSat offers a high-value, specialized analytics platform

A better path is being created by FluroSat. This Australian start-up aggregates agricultural data across farms using its analytics platform FluroSense. It takes imagery, agronomic models, weather, and IoT data and provides granular insights that directly impact yields.

Instead of forcing users to reconfigure their workflow from scratch, FluroSat allows them to seamlessly integrate their existing infrastructure with the FluroSense engine. The company concentrates exclusively on analytics, focusing on the development of high value-add applications while avoiding the costly hardware associated with data capture. And by targeting the agronomist rather than the farmer, they connect with a more receptive customer. 

Space Capital support will unlock further growth 

FluroSat’s unique approach to agricultural data is why Space Capital is happy to announce our participation in the company's series seed round of investment alongside Microsoft's venture arm M12 Ventures, Main Sequence Ventures, AirTree Ventures, and Costanoa Ventures. We will be working closely with the company to unlock high-value satellite sources and data integration partnerships.

With these connections in place, we’ll help diversify the company's product mix and deliver cost-effective services on a global scale. This doesn’t just mean occupying a valuable niche within a growing, multibillion-dollar industry. It also means helping farms produce more food with less waste—progress that is increasingly necessary to feed the world’s booming population. 


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