Totum’s Global Network Aims to Unlock Multi-Billion IoT Market

Satellites
August 14, 2019
Author
Justus Kilian
Jessica Holland
August 14, 2019
Authors
Justus Kilian
Jessica Holland

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

 Totum’s Global Network Aims to Unlock Multi-Billion IoT Market
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The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

The number of connected devices worldwide will skyrocket in the next few years, from just over 17 billion, as estimated in 2018, to more than 60 billion by 2024. That figure includes phones, computers, and tablets, but also smart gadgets that monitor environments, streamline manufacturing, and reduce inefficiencies across industries like energy, healthcare, and manufacturing

One sector within IoT that is poised to take off is the market for asset tracking and monitoring. There is huge value in being able to track pallets, containers, and rail-cars in transit, as well as industrial equipment and individual packages. This type of activity is predicted to generate 2.5 billion connections by 2025.

For this potential to be unlocked, however, extremely low-cost global connectivity is needed. Many terrestrial and satellite-based networks have been launched to service these new connected devices, but both types of platforms have limitations. The shared limitation is an inability to connect assets seamlessly and ubiquitously, even when indoors, at a low enough cost to add value. That is why less than 100 million asset tracking and monitoring endpoints are connected today.

Worldwide connectivity at unprecedentedly low prices

This was the challenge that Totum Labs was created to solve. The company’s CEO and Founder, Ted Myers, previously invented a type of connectivity network, Random Phase Multiple Access (RPMA), that now covers 45 million people in the US alone. He has been working with Dr. Andrew Viterbi, the pioneering co-founder of the innovative telecom company Qualcomm, to create a new network that will solve the problems holding back low-cost IoT.

The new Doppler Multi-Channel Spread Spectrum (DMSS) technology they are building works by using nanosatellites in low earth orbit and uses the same (free, global) 2.4GHz frequency band as WiFi and Bluetooth. It supports seamless worldwide connectivity, using low-power processing that ensures a long battery life for the devices involved.

A white paper co-authored by Myers and Viterbi estimates the price point needed to properly unlock the asset tracking and monitoring market is $3 for communication modules and less than $2 per year for a connectivity subscription per device. Totum’s plan to make this happen involves starting with a constellation of 50 satellites in Low Earth Orbit. Later, that number will increase to 500, with a network of terrestrial towers to offload capacity on a regional basis, which will drive down the cost of data delivery. By ultimately being able to connect hundreds of millions of smart objects, Totum will offer the ubiquitous coverage needed at a price that’s unprecedentedly low. 

Drawing on decades of experience in the industry

Totum’s solution is new and disruptive within the asset-tracking sector, but it is inspired by previous innovations. One of these was Omnitracs, an early initiative by Qualcomm to provide continuous position location and messaging connectivity between long-haul trucks and their dispatchers across North America, using geostationary satellites. Launched in 1988, the system is still in operation now, serving hundreds of thousands of trucks in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. It was sold for $800 million in 2011 and is valued as high as $2 billion today.

Not only was Omnitracs a commercial success it also established a number of technical breakthroughs. It was the first wide-area mobile data service and the first successful civilian use of spread spectrum signal modulation, which diminished the effects of interference and other forms of signal distortion. The initiative also showed that a satellite network can provide a more cost-effective means of serving a continent-wide area than the large number of towers required for a terrestrial system. 

The second example Totum has drawn from is Globalstar, a joint venture of Loral Corporation and Qualcomm, launched in 1991, which provided telephone connectivity. This was achieved using Low Earth Orbit satellites and Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technology that shares similarities with Totum’s DMSS technology. This initiative demonstrated how continuous connectivity is possible using satellites in low earth orbit, and provides a template for the costs involved in launching such a network.

Space Capital investment will accelerate growth

By working with Qualcomm founder Dr. Andrew Viterbi to create Totum’s core technology, Totum is able to build on the expertise and experience cultivated by these initiatives. At the same time, the company is able to break new ground by harnessing much more powerful modern developments in areas such as memory capacity and processing capabilities and speed.

Along with the reduced cost of the new-generation nanosatellites, this makes it possible for Totum to provide wireless connectivity to an unprecedented number of devices at much lower costs than we have previously seen, while also allowing the signal to penetrate indoors. This is a requirement for IoT services and a game-changing development for ubiquitous low-cost connectivity.

Impressed by this ambitious vision, Space Capital invested in the company's seed round along with Heroic Ventures, Hunt Technology Ventures, Redwood Coast Capital, and Dr. Andrew Viterbi earlier this year. We are now working closely with the company to accelerate its on-orbit demonstration and pathway to scale. We’re excited to see the impact this could have on a booming IoT market that is expected to be worth more than a trillion dollars by 2025.

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